Live long and healthy after 65 depends on state - WXOW News 19 La Crosse, WI – News, Weather and Sports |

Live long and healthy after 65 depends on state

Posted:
  • HealthMore>>

  • NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules

    NCAA settles head-injury suit, will change rules

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 9:15 PM EDT2014-07-30 01:15:26 GMT
    The NCAA has agreed to settle a class-action head injury lawsuit by creating a $70 million fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing...More >>
    The NCAA agreed on Tuesday to help athletes with head injuries in a proposed settlement of a class-action lawsuit that college sports' governing body touted as a major step forward but that critics say doesn't go...More >>
  • 5 food writers subpoenaed in 'pink slime' lawsuit

    5 food writers subpoenaed in 'pink slime' lawsuit

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 9:13 PM EDT2014-07-30 01:13:08 GMT
    Several food writers, including a New York Times reporter, have been subpoenaed as part of a company's $1.2 billion defamation lawsuit against ABC related to the network's coverage of a meat product derided...More >>
    Several food writers, including a New York Times reporter, have been subpoenaed by a meat producer as part of its $1.2 billion defamation lawsuit against ABC in regards to the network's coverage of a beef product...More >>
  • Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

    Generation of tanners see spike in deadly melanoma

    Tuesday, July 29 2014 8:26 PM EDT2014-07-30 00:26:12 GMT
    The acting U.S. surgeon general is asking Americans to give up their love of sunbathing and indoor tanning beds, citing an alarming 200 percent jump in the number of deadly melanoma cases diagnosed since 1973.More >>
    Stop sunbathing and using indoor tanning beds, the acting U.S. surgeon general warned in a report released Tuesday that cites an alarming 200 percent jump in deadly melanoma cases since 1973.More >>

SUNDAY, JULY 21 (HealthDay News) -- Place and race influence healthy life expectancy at age 65, U.S. health officials said Thursday.

Blacks across the country and whites in the South have the lowest healthy life expectancy after age 65, according to 2007-2009 data analyzed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Healthy life expectancy refers to healthy aging, or the number of years lived without disability.

"Our data show there is a disparity by race and region in healthy aging," said Paula Yoon, acting director of CDC's Epidemiology and Analysis Program Office and report co-author.

To try to eliminate this disparity, state-by-state efforts are needed to encourage people to live healthier lifestyles and to provide access to quality health care, she noted.

"We really need to support the prevention programs that make it easier for people to be healthy no matter who they are or where they live," Yoon said.

Healthy life expectancy is lowest in the South, compared with other areas of the United States, according to the report, published July 19 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Based on self-reported information, healthy life expectancy for men at 65 years ranged from a low of 10.1 years in Mississippi to a high of 15 years in Hawaii. In other words, a Mississippi man who lived to 65 would be impaired by 75, on average, compared to males in Hawaii who would stay healthy until 80. For women the range was 11.4 years in Mississippi to 17.3 years in Hawaii, the researchers found.

Women in general had a greater healthy life expectancy after age 65 than men. This gender difference ranged from 0.7 years for Louisiana residents to 3.1 years in the Dakotas.

Southerners had the lowest healthy life expectancy among whites at age 65 years, ranging from 11 years in West Virginia to nearly 19 years in Washington, D.C.

For blacks, healthy life expectancy was lower than for whites throughout the nation, except in New Mexico and Nevada. The racial gap ranged from 7.1 years in Iowa to 15.1 years in New Mexico.

Many factors contribute to healthy aging, Yoon said.

"These include safe and healthy living environments; healthy behaviors, such as exercise and not smoking; getting recommended preventative services, such as vaccines, cancer screenings and blood pressure checks; and having access to good quality health care," she said.

More information

For more information on life expectancy, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 WorldNow and WXOW. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, Terms of Service and Mobile Privacy Policy & Terms of Service.

Persons with disabilities who need assistance with issues relating to the content of this station's public inspection file should contact Administrative Assistant Theresa Wopat at 507-895-9969. Questions or concerns relating to the accessibility of the FCC's online public file system should be directed to the FCC at 888-225-5322, at 888-835-5322 (TTY) or at fccinfo@fcc.gov.