Holmen high school students put on anti-bully show - WXOW News 19 La Crosse, WI – News, Weather and Sports |

Holmen high school students put on anti-bully show

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HOLMEN, Wisconsin (WXOW)-- Holmen High School students are spreading an anti-bullying message using skits.

The program is called S.E.E.D.S., which stands for Students Envisioning Equality Through Diversity Skits. Tuesday, they preformed for local elementary students.

"The teachers from those schools and the guidance counselors tell us what the problems are at those schools and then we try to make skits around those topics," Dillon Martinez, a senior and S.E.E.D.S. member. "We try to throw a little humor in there because it can't be too serious for the little kids."

The performance touches on things like behaving in class, what to do if a friend is being hurt at home and bullying..

Khadijah Islam joined S.E.E.D.S. because she was bullied in middle school.

"You know people would just pick on me because I'm a different skin color and I have a different hair color," Khadijah said. "I thought it would be helpful for me to give that to someone else, in case they were going through what I went through."

S.E.E.D.S. performs for every student in the district, tweaking the skits for each grade. But it's the presentation in January, to their high school peers, that proves the most challenging to prepare for.

"We talk about things like suicide and drugs and dating abuse and stuff like that, texting and driving, that's when it gets really serious," Dillon said. "And we've all cried, making these skits. And that's also how we come together so strong and form a good bond and feed off each other."

The students write the skits themselves, often based on their experience with bullies and peer pressure.

"It gets hard because the harder stuff happens in high school so you can't do as many funny skits because there's a lot more tough issues and you want to approach them in a serious way," Khadijah said.

The show for these third graders ends with the students breaking up in to different groups, based on their race, age, even height, but they come together in the end, a diverse group that makes up S.E.E.D.S.

"I hope by being a figure they look up to in a way, they can see that I'm acting up here on the stage and portraying behaviors that are acceptable and good," Dillon said. "And hopefully they'll translate that in to their life."

HOLMEN, Wisconsin (WXOW)-- Holmen High School students are spreading an anti-bullying message using skits.

 

The program is called S.E.E.D.S., which stands for Students Envisioning Equality Through Diversity Skits. Tuesday, they preformed for local elementary students.

 

"The teachers from those schools and the guidance counselors tell us what the problems are at those schools and then we try to make skits around those topics," Dillon Martinez, a senior and S.E.E.D.S. member. "We try to throw a little humor in there because it can't be too serious for the little kids."

 

The performance touches on things like behaving in class, what to do if a friend is being hurt at home and bullying..

Khadijah Islam joined S.E.E.D.S. because she was bullied in middle school.

 

"You know people would just pick on me because I'm a different skin color and I have a different hair color," Khadijah said. "I thought it would be helpful for me to give that to someone else, in case they were going through what I went through."

 

S.E.E.D.S. performs for every student in the district, tweaking the skits for each grade. But it's the presentation in January, to their high school peers, that proves the most challenging to prepare for.

 

"We talk about things like suicide and drugs and dating abuse and stuff like that, texting and driving, that's when it gets really serious," Dillon said. "And we've all cried, making these skits. And that's also how we come together so strong and form a good bond and feed off each other."

 

The students write the skits themselves, often based on their experience with bullies and peer pressure.

 

"It gets hard because the harder stuff happens in high school so you can't do as many funny skits because there's a lot more tough issues and you want to approach them in a serious way," Khadijah said.

 

The show for these third graders ends with the students breaking up in to different groups, based on their race, age, even height, but they come together in the end, a diverse group that makes up S.E.E.D.S.

 

"I hope by being a figure they look up to in a way, they can see that I'm acting up here on the stage and portraying behaviors that are acceptable and good," Dillon said. "And hopefully they'll translate that in to their life."

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